This week I was reminded about the driving force of one’s identity, priorities and values when making changes and setting goals.

Change is possible, but it must start with self-acceptance. —Alexander Lowen

What you identify as your core values will help guide you toward what you are most passionate about when it comes to play

One skill set I help my clients with, and you can also develop, is enhancing your ability to know yourself by identifying your core values.

As Ted Lasso says, “For me, success is not about the wins and losses. It’s about helping these young fellas be the best versions of themselves on and off the field.”

In The Play Book, I help people work through their thoughts and actions about becoming more active and help them prepare for action because change is more likely to stick when you choose something consistent with your higher values. 

You can click HERE to download a worksheet on identifying your core values.

Your values drive your emotions and will help you make the decisions that matter for your daily personal play journey.  

Values are why you show up in life every day and help you prioritize what’s important.

Values silently guide our actions. Like using a map or a GPS to help get you to your destination, your values drive your motivation to move forward or hold you back in fear. 

When you understand who you are and where you are going, it is easier to decide the path you want to take, day in and day out. 

Your values can change over time, but understanding what you value deepens your understanding of what is truly inspiring you. 

Values make life and play meaningful.

With all the changes in the world and many demands on our time, it’s not easy to prioritize play.

I get it.  

Unfortunately, many people let their careers come before their health. 

My clients are busy, successful professionals ready to get their health back.  

They’re strapped for time, have too much stress, not enough sleep, and are used to putting other people’s needs before their own. 

In her Ted Talk called “How to Make Hard Choices,” philosopher Ruth Chang says that when it comes to making hard choices, each of us has the power to create our reasons to either do or not do something. 

Ultimately the choices we make are influenced by the things we value.

I think this notion about values is crucial. It’s much easier to navigate choices when you understand what you do and do not value. 

The importance of knowing who you are as a person and what you believe helps us live our lives to the fullest potential.

You need to ask yourself which choice better aligns with your beliefs and values.  

So instead of me telling you what I think you should do, let me ask you this: When it comes to your mobility, independence, and freedom, what kind of future do you hope for yourself?

Play on!

Your coach and friend,

Janet

 

P.S. If you know a woman or are one over the age of 35, don’t miss out on the FREE virtual “Perimenopause and Beyond Summit” happening May 1-10th.  Here’s the link to join over 20 experts (including me!) who will get you started asking yourself the right questions to thrive AND feel fabulous through life!