I genuinely believe that the basics of health, exercise and nutrition are simple; it is the sales and marketing of health and wellness that are confusing.

Wading through all the information on this topic in the media can be intimidating.

People are looking to follow “rules.”

But the rules the health and fitness industry have made are unsustainable.

People end up following the wrong advice fail and then feel bad (hint – it’s not your fault). What’s worse, people are feeling lost and confused without gyms in the age of coronavirus.

But what if it doesn’t have to be that complicated?

When I wrote my book The Play Book: How To Get In The Habit Of Good Health, I wanted to bring all that I’ve learned and understand about ONE habit – exercise – and reframe it in the simplest form.

To strip it down and present it the way I truly see it, in a way that anyone, regardless of confidence, fitness level, or social status, can do.

Play as exercise.

No, this isn’t me trying to disguise a word or use a clever marketing ploy. And it’s certainly not about having washboard abs or being on the cover of a magazine.

It’s about taking control of your life so that you can live fully.

I’m on a mission to re-ignite people’s passion for play to fight chronic disease while improving their quality of life as they age.

Playing is an incredible opportunity to find joy in life and engage our mind, body, and spirit in the relentless pursuit of happiness. It supports your immune system, amongst other things, which helps fight disease.

And it’s free.

I must admit that sometimes I need a little inspiration to play – maybe I’m feeling tired or overwhelmed.

This week, I was inspired by a man I’ve never met named John Hillman.

John is a 101-year-old war veteran from Victoria, B.C, who, on his birthday, made a goal of walking 101 laps around his residence parking lot to raise money for Save the Children Canada’s COVID-19 Relief Fund.

He turned 101 and decided to raise $1100, and walk those 101 laps over a number of days. There were crowds that gathered to watch (my mom, brother and sister – who took this picture – were there), and every time John did a lap, he put a mark on a chalkboard to keep track.

John blew the top off of his goal and raised over $101,000!

Here is a link to his story

In the middle of a pandemic, we are facing the reality that our most vulnerable ageing population is at the highest risk of getting sick. However, John proved that even when you have obstacles, like age or disease in your way, you can find simple ways to play.

What about setting attainable, back-to-basics habits like walking!

John is a true example of play, or exercise, being the pure freedom to move your body in any way that brings you joy, makes you sweat a little, and smile a lot!

Thank you, John, for keeping it simple and being an inspiration.